Author: Tim

2

Magnificent boobies

Our destination after the four-night passage was always hoped to be Isla Isabella, a national park and wildlife refuge. We were told how we could walk amongst the nesting birds there as they were unafraid of humans. However, it would be the weather that would dictate if we could actually stop here or not, as any stiff breeze makes the...

3

Starfish or bolster spooning

Our plan was to sail almost 500 miles straight through to our next destination. This distance would take us over four nights, but even if we wanted to do smaller hops there are few along the way. Single overnight passages are the worst, followed closely by two-night passages. Your body never gets to adjust to this awful sleep schedule that...

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Another month in Guaymas

I’ve really not wanted to write this blog post. I have no enthusiasm to write about the times we sit in one place for a long period of time just “getting shit done” before our next big journey, and that’s what this past 6 weeks has been. So, I’m going to phone this one in a bit and just touch...

2

Waiting in Guaymas

We crossed the Sea of Cortez, and came to Guaymas, for a reason. A few reasons actually. First was to get some canvas work done by a well known canvas worker here in town. we had been carrying around a ton of canvas and related items for over a year now, specifically for this time. The other reason came recently,...

1

Ghosts at sea

Kerri and I thought we would just sit still and recoup from the week long visit with family, but after only a single day of said recuperations – which included a couple hour sail and socializing with another couple (read; no recuperation time) – our eyes were firmly set on the next big passage. Weather rules all as cruisers. Days...

1

A visit from my brother

Since mid way through our summer in Penasco, we added only one thing on our schedule (other then getting ourselves back on the water); a visit from my brother (Tobias) and his wife (Beth). They had both been on Meriwether back in Monterey, as we passed through the area on our way South, but only while tied to a dock....

7

Punta Chivato

We left Santa Rosalia a few days after the new years, to continue our southern momentum. We chose a nice weather window to make the 30 mile sail further down the Baja coastline. Actually, we chose this day as the next week afterwards was forecast to blow from the north. With wind on our back side, we sailed for more...

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Summarizing our 2023 sailing season

Just before Jan 1 of 2023 we entered Mexico via Ensenada. After a three week stay in the marina for final packages, paperwork, and supplies we set sail down the west coast of Baja. Some hops where multi-day/night sails in the open ocean, others were single day sails. We got to meet up with long time friends, the Malimish family...

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Santa Rosalia for the new years

From our last anchorage to Santa Rosalia is 75 nautical miles of open water with no safe anchorages along the way, so it has to be done in a single voyage. Moving at barely the pace of a New York City jogger doesn’t get you through 75 miles very quickly; about 14 hours in total. At this time of year...

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San Francisquito & Santa Teresa

A good sized northerly blow was threatening us in a few days time, and while we were somewhat protected where we were on Isla Salsipuedes, it wasn’t the best. And, if we stayed, we would have been stuck there another five days or more while the blow… well, blew. So, a couple days before the wind was to visit, we...